The Academic Sexual Misconduct and Violations of Relationship Policies Database

Updated 9/15/18 to be crystal clear that I include violations of relationship policies within the database.

Over two years ago, I started tracking academic sexual misconduct and violations of relationship policies. I started the project in an attempt to address what I saw as a missing piece of media reporting on misconduct in academia. In general, the media reports on one case at a time, occasionally mentioning other cases although without any sense of the broader culture of sexual harassment within some areas of academia. Since I began tracking cases, the database has grown from a few dozen to over 700 evidenced cases.

Several people have used these data to conduct studies. I will list these here as they get published:

  1. Cantalupo, N. C., & Kidder, W. C. (2018). A Systematic Look at a Serial Problem: Sexual Harassment of Students by University Faculty. Utah Law Review, 2018(3), 4.
  2. http://sites.nationalacademies.org/shstudy/index.htm

I have migrated the database from a list to a google sheet to facilitate broader use of these data. You can view the google sheet below, or view it in google by clicking on this link ACADEMIC SEXUAL MISCONDUCT DATABASE.

The database is very likely incomplete. If you would like to share an evidenced sexual misconduct case against a faculty, administrator, researcher, or similar university or research institute employee, you can submit it HERE. Please note that only cases with evidence of sexual misconduct can be included. PLEASE CHECK THE DATABASE CAREFULLY BEFORE SUBMITTING A NEW CASE.

  • Academic includes individuals who are employed in any setting where college or university students are working or studying.
  • Sexual misconduct includes: sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual misconduct, stalking, violations of dating policies, violations of campus pornography policies, and similar violations
  • Evidence includes: institutional finding; admission on part of the accused, accused resigned/retired/died before an institution completed an investigation; a settlement by either the accused or the institution was reached with the victim/survivor; documented evidence (usually in form of texts or emails) of sexual misconduct exists; a legal finding of fact was made by a court, with or without legal punishment.